The National Labor Relations Board found that a union committed an unfair labor practice by repeatedly blocking ingress and egress to a hotel for periods of one to four minutes. The opinion provides details about the union’s picketing efforts as a part of an organizing campaign. The blockage occurred during at least ten separate occasions over the course of more than a month. The Board adopted the ALJ’s decision holding that the picketers’ actions of standing in front of vehicles for minutes at a time, many driven by hotel valets, attempting to enter and/or exit the hotel violated Section 8(b)(1)(A) of the National Labor Relations Act.

As the dissent notes, this decision is significant because there were no allegations of violence and because the blockage lasted such short periods of time. Regardless, the Board determined that the union’s repeated, intentional blockage of drivers, including employees, would reasonably tend to coerce or intimidate employees in the exercise of their Section 7 rights.

Although injunctive relief was not sought in this situation, the NLRB’s decision in Unite Here! Local 5 (Acqua-Aston Hospitality, LLC) provides management with support for prompt relief in similar circumstances. Contact Husch Blackwell’s Labor and Employment team with any questions or to discuss options for responding to union activity in your business.

On December 14, 2017, the National Labor Relations Board (the “NLRB” or the “Board”) overruled Obama-era precedent involving two highly controversial decisions governing employee handbooks and joint employment standards.

Earlier this year, President Trump appointed two Republicans to the five-member NLRB resulting in a 3-2 Republican majority for the first time in a decade.  As anticipated, the new “Trump Board” is beginning to dismantle a series of decisions that many believed to unfairly favor unions.

New Standard Governing Employee Handbooks

In a split 3-2 decision, the Board majority in  . overturned its 2004 Lutheran Heritage standard, which had been used in recent years to render countless employer policies and rules unlawful.  The former standard provided that a policy or rule is unlawful if employees could “reasonably construe” the language to bar them from exercising their rights under the NLRA, such as discussing terms and conditions of employment.  For the past several years, the Lutheran Heritage standard has been heavily criticized for failing to take into account legitimate business justifications associated with employer policies, rules and handbook provisions in addition to yielding unpredictable and sometimes contradictory results.  For example, the standard has deemed unlawful policies that require employees to “work harmoniously” or conduct themselves in a “positive and professional manner.”

Continue Reading NLRB Overturns Pro-Union Precedent Governing Employee Handbooks and Joint Employers

The NLRB today announced it is requesting Information from interested parties regarding whether or not the 2014 Election Rules should be retained in any fashion or at all.  No doubt this is a heads up that these rules are going to have a short life span with the Agency.  This will be a very public battle and further information regarding the Board’s actions will be made available as they develop.

It is not unusual on construction sites, where you have a variety of different employers present, that disputes erupt that impact the entire work site. Sometimes this can result in a number of different forms of employee protest and this decision by an Administrative Law Judge, which issued on December 8, 2017, provides a good framework for analyzing what is lawful versus unlawful conduct by an employer in responding to such activity.

Continue Reading NLRB – Project Manager at Work Site May Lawfully Monitor Misconduct

Peter Robb, the new General Counsel for the NLRB, issued GC Memo 18-02 on December 1, 2017 that puts the Regional Offices on notice that any “significant legal issues” are to be submitted to Advice. Significant legal issues are defined to “include cases over the last 8 years that overruled precedent and involved one or more dissents, cases involving issues that the Board has not decided, and any other cases that the Region believes will be of importance to General Counsel.”  The Memo goes on to further cite specific examples of Board Decisions that might support issuance of complaint “but where we also might want to provide the Board with an alternative analysis.”  Not surprisingly, these decisions go to a number of cases in which the Obama Board expanded their regulation regarding concerted activity, handbook rules, work stoppages, Weingarten rights, the joint employer standard, unilateral changes, and dues checkoff, among other matters.  No doubt that with this Memo the way in which the workplace will be regulated by the NLRB will be subject to a number of long awaited changes.

The U.S. Solicitor General changing positions, the NLRB issuing a follow-up letter to oral arguments and the grave observation that a ruling for employees would invalidate agreements covering 25 million employees all reflect the contentious nature of the consolidated cases before the Supreme Court challenging the ability of an employee and employer to agree to limit resolution of legal claims to individual arbitration.

Continue Reading The Enforceability of Arbitration Agreements Covering 25 Million Employees Wait on a Divided Supreme Court

On August 7, 2017, a Fifth Circuit panel ruled, in a divided decision, that a class-action waiver can be enforceable even without an arbitration agreement being involved. In that case, the Convergys Corporation required its applicants to sign a class-action waiver even though it was not contained in an arbitration agreement. The Convergys Corp. v. National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruling rejected a NLRB decision holding that the company cannot require its job applicants to sign class action waivers that prevent them from suing the company.

Continue Reading The Fifth Circuit Strengthens Employers’ Right to Use Class Action Waivers

For many of us who have been watching the changes made in various administrative agencies the appointments by President Trump to fill the two empty positions on the NLRB is a key start in making changes in a number of over-reaching decisions during the Obama administration. With the changeover to a new General Counsel in November the transformation will be complete.

Employers have been frustrated for some time with the numerous case decisions and policies developed by the NLRB in recent years which simply micromanage the workplace. The announcement of these appointments, frankly, is a breath of fresh air after many, many years of putting up with decisions that are not only damaging to the economy, but an embarrassment in terms of the ill-founded basis for many of the opinions which were issued by the Board. We need a much more balanced viewpoint of the workplace and hopefully we are on the right path to make that a reality.

The National Labor Relations Board issued an Order on May 3, 2017 in which it made clear that the Board does not wish to exercise its discretionary authority to expand Weingarten Rights to non-union employees via rule making.  The potential for the expansion of the Weingarten Rights to non-union employees has been in place ever since the Board issued its position in 2004 in the case of IBM Corporation, 341 NLRB 1288, whereby it limited Weingarten Rights to union shops.  However, this is an issue which the Board has flip-flopped on during most of its existence.  At times it has allowed Weingarten to be applied in a non-union setting, and then changed its mind and reverted back to the current situation where Weingarten only applies in a union environment.  Regardless of the motivation behind making this determination, it is good news that the Board, at this point in time, has decided not to expand Weingarten to the vast majority of the workplaces.